exhibitions

Minotaur - Daria Martin e Anna Halprin

Dec 16 - Feb 4, 2012
via a. stradella 7
Raffaella Cortese is proud to present a new double show featuring London-based filmmaker Daria Martin (b. 1973, San Francisco) and American performer and choreographer Anna Halprin (b.1920).
The exhibition titled Minotaur is the first in a series of upcoming shows in which two artists choose one another and discuss key aspects of their individual research. For this season we invited artists from different generations who are intimately connected by a teacher-student relationship. Daria Martin has asked Anna Halprin to collaborate on her 9 minute, 16mm film Minotaur as she considers Halprin an inspirational reference point in postmodern dance. Halprin is a seminal figure in 20th century choreography, whose career spans more than seven decades. Often credited as inventing postmodern dance, in the 1960ʼs she taught Yvonne Rainer, Trisha Brown, Simone Forti, Robert Morris and others who later went on to form the Judson Church Group in New York. In the later half of her career, she became a leading figure in the field of dance as a healing art.
Halprin has created an original choreography for the dancers in Daria Martinʼs Minotaur that draws inspiration from Rodin's sculptures themed on Greek mythology.
Daria Martin's direction creates a sense of imaginary travel, guiding the spectator from photographs to sculptures to dance, in which objects, bodies, and the ephemerality of the film medium are presented as equivalent. Contrary to what we see in Rodin's sculpture, the feminine is not in Martinʼs and Halprinʼs rendering treated as victim. The female protagonist becomes a winner over the ancient and menacing mythical creature, who has been challenged to a dance match. Minotaur will be projected along with Martinʼs first film, In the Palace (2000), which presaged her interest in dance, and its presentation as equivalent to sculpture. Staging a series of tableaux vivants within a scaled up version of Giacomettiʼs The Palace at 4am (1932), a group of dancers evoke iconic moments from within 20th dance history, although they remain still, only the camera moving round them.
Daria Martinʼs films will be accompanied by the first Italian exhibition of Anna Halprin's personal archive of photos, drawings and sketches for choreographies. The traces of Halprin's contribution to the 1963 Venice Biennale, is especially worthy of note, as are images documenting Circle The Earth, her project from the 1980ʼs and 90ʼs in which she worked with sufferers of HIV/AIDS.
Daria Martinʼs and Anna Halprinʼs work can also be seen in Danser Sa View at the Centre Pompidou, Paris, through 12 April, 2012, in an exhibition that unites over 300 artists through an investigation between the links between ʻfine artʼ and dance.
Daria Martin has exhibited in solo shows in several important institutions such as the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, The New Museum New York and MCA Chicago in 2010; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdami in 2006, Kunsthalle Zürich and the Kunstverein in Hamburg in 2005. Her work has been presented in numerous international art events such as Blockbuster exhibition curated by Jens Hoffmann at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Monterey; a nude Manʼs city Museum of Modern Art Sao Paulo, Brazil in 2010; Le Sang dʼun Poet sain-nazaire Biennale, Nantes France in 2009, Manifesta 7, 2008, The Tate Triennial, 2006. Daria Martin's films are held in important art collections such as Tate, London; The New Museum, New York; Kadist Foundation, Paris, Ringier Zurich and Arts Council England, London.
Anna Halprin is the creator of 150 original theater pieces. She has documented her activity in videos and photography and she has written three published books. She is the recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts; the Guggenheim the American Dance Guild, and many others. Returning Home is amongst her most recent videos. In 2006 Mac Lyon dedicated her a retrospective exhibition. In 2009 Beath Made Visible, Halprins biopic documentary was presented in several cities around the world.